It takes just one drop of blood to tell more about someone's health than any other test.

I have observed one physician practicing in a small community hospital. It is important to note that he was a public health doctor 
before joining this practice. Unlike other physicians, he does not use fancy laboratory tests to diagnose his patients. Instead, he 
always ordered a peripheral blood smear from the laboratory and examined it in his office. Since most patients here do not have 
health insurance, he did this to save them money.

What does a blood smear tell him? 
By using a blood smear, it is possible to determine whether the red, white, and platelet cells are normal or abnormal by examining
their appearance, size, and shape. Also, it can provide information regarding the presence of viruses or bacteria in an infection. 
Moreover, it can detect parasites in a patient's blood by performing a blood smear.

The following pictures show normal and abnormal blood cells under the microscope.
       
Normal, mature RBCs are biconcave, disc-shaped, nuclear 
cells measuring approximately 7-8 microns in diameter.



A sickle cell anemia is one of a group of inherited disorders called sickle cell disease. It affects the shape of red blood cells, which 
carry oxygen to all body parts.

There are many diseases a blood smear can detect besides Sickle cell anemia. I intend to briefly describe each condition seen by 
 a blood smear benefits the readers and some physicians who want to increase their skills in diagnosing the disease when complete 
 blood tests are unavailable.
แก้ไขข้อความเมื่อ
แสดงความคิดเห็น
โปรดศึกษาและยอมรับนโยบายข้อมูลส่วนบุคคลก่อนเริ่มใช้งาน อ่านเพิ่มเติมได้ที่นี่